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Differences between spoken and written English

Differences between spoken and written English



As with most languages, written language tends to use a more formal register than spoken language. The acquisition of literacy takes significant effort in English.

Spelling and pronunciation:



probably the biggest difficulty for non-native speakers, since the relation between English spelling and pronunciation does not follow the alphabetic principle consistently. Because of the many changes in pronunciation which have occurred since a written standard developed, the retention of many historical idiosyncrasies in spelling, and the large influx of foreign words (mainly from Danish, Norman French, Classical Latin and Greek) with different and overlapping spelling patterns,

English spelling and pronunciation are difficult even for native speakers to master. This difficulty is shown in such activities as spelling bees that generally require the memorization of words. The generalizations that exist are quite complex and there are many exceptions, leading to a considerable amount of rote learning. The spelling and pronunciation system causes problems in both directions: a learner may know a word by sound but be unable to write it correctly (or indeed find it in a dictionary) or they may see a word written but not know how to pronounce it or mislearn the pronunciation. However, despite the variety of spelling patterns in English, there are dozens of rules that are 75% or more reliable.[12] For further discussion of English spelling patterns and rules.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Why Written Communication Skills Are Important - Training Courses in Hong Kong

Why Written Communication Skills Are Important
By
Krystalina Soash


Krystalina-Soash_264705
As a writer and public speaker, I often ask myself "What is the purpose of writing and speaking?" And I answer, "It is to communicate a point effectively". So whether we speak, write a speech or memo, the whole purpose is to communicate effectively. Then we have to ask, "What is it that we are trying to communicate?"
Following are some important points to keep in mind when attempting to communicate your point:

  • State your most important point first. That is, what is the basis of your letter, memo, speech or email? State that point in the very beginning so your reader will know what to focus on.
  • When addressing your reader, think about your audience. Who are you actually directing your communication towards? Is it your "in group" that understands your lingo? Is it your professional comrade that understands your jargon? Be sure to only use terms and clichés that are understood by your professional insiders.
  • Use correct grammar and spelling. Your professionalism will carry a lot of weight when it comes to proper grammar and spelling. You will gain credibility among your listeners and/or readers when you communicate in an appropriate manner.
  • Use your 'active voice' not your 'passive voice'. For example, instead of saying "It's been found that our accounting..." Say instead, "Our accounting records reveal that..." In other words don't leave the reader hanging as to 'who' is doing the processing. Let them know from the start that 'you know' who is doing the action!
  • Last but not least, read your letter, email, recording, or speech out loud before you put it out. Check for emphasis on words and the intent of your message.

We have very good intentions when we want to convey a message and the better we refine that message the better the results. You're encouraged to review the points above for a positive outcome on your next message, whether written, recorded, or spoken. Best to you!
Krystalina Soash is a public speaker, trilingual interpreter and author of "Your Positive Potential: Action Steps for Self-Empowerment"
You may visit Krystalina at
http://www.yourpositivepotential.com/Home.php (formerly known as WritingForYouNow.com)
Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Krystalina_Soash
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